Description

This FREE, 4-week on-demand course offers 9.75 CME/CE credits and provides a comprehensive overview of diagnostic criteria, assessment techniques, recovery patterns, and rehabilitation strategies for traumatic brain injuries (TBI).

Course faculty begin with a focus on foundational knowledge about TBI, such as the spectrum of TBI severity, anticipated outcomes between mild versus severe TBI, and criteria for diagnosis and management of TBI from onset through the acute recovery stage. Topics then progress to address common clinical challenges associated with TBI, such as:

  • Recognizing similarities and differences in recovery among athletes, civilians and active-duty service members
  • Differentiating typical from atypical recovery patterns
  • Selecting treatment and rehabilitation strategies for veterans with mild TBI and ongoing problems with mental health and chronic pain

Our goal is to help you translate knowledge into enhanced clinical practice that provides better outcomes for patients, so the course includes live interaction with faculty at set times each week to address clinical questions and discuss course materials. Course content is 100% mobile-friendly and completely on-demand, so you can participate whenever your schedule allows.

Presenters for this course include:

  • Grant L. Iverson, PhD, Course Director
  • Timothy J. Petersen, PhD
  • Lenore Herget, PT, DPT, MEd
  • Nicholas A. Tritos, MD, DSc
  • Ross D. Zafonte, DO

Learning Objectives

At the end of this program, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the spectrum of traumatic brain injury severity.
  • Explain the differences in anticipated outcomes between those with mild versus severe TBI.
  • Explain the criteria for diagnosing a mild traumatic brain injury and the recommendations for how to manage the injury in the acute recovery stage.
  • Recognize the similarities and differences in recovery trajectories among athletes, civilians, and active duty service members.
  • Differentiate typical from atypical recovery patterns.
  • Describe the differential diagnoses for the post-concussion syndrome.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of treatment and rehabilitation strategies for veterans who have a history of mild TBI and ongoing problems with mental health and chronic pain.

Agenda

Subject to change without notice.

Session I.

Introduction to Traumatic Brain Injury: Definitions, Severity, and Clinical Features
Grant L. Iverson, PhD

Key Elements:

  • Describe the spectrum of traumatic brain injury severity.
  • List 3 symptoms, deficits, or problems that might be permanent following a severe TBI.
  • Explain the differences in anticipated outcomes between those with mild versus severe TBI.
  • Know the definition of mild TBI and the acute effects.

Session Outline:

Part 1. Moderate-Severe TBI

  1. Epidemiology
  2. Pathoanatomy and Pathophysiology
  3. Neurological and Neuropsychiatric Problems
  4. Functional and Neuropsychological Outcome

Part 2. Mild TBI

  1. Overview
  2. Acute Symptoms
  3. Recovery Time
Session II.

Mild TBI Diagnosis, Early Management, and Overview of the Post-Concussion Syndrome
Grant L. Iverson, PhD

Key Elements:

  • List the criteria used to define a mild TBI.
  • Describe an approach for the early management of the injury.
  • Define the post-concussion syndrome and some important differential diagnoses.

Session Outline:

Part 1. Identification/Diagnosis

  1. Definitional and Injury Severity Criteria
  2. Acute Assessment

Part 2. Rest, Return to Activity, and use of Education and Reassurance

  1. Rest Following Injury
  2. Gradual Return to Sports Protocol
  3. Progressive Return to Activity Guidelines for Service Members
  4. Education and Reassurance

Part 3. Introduction to the Post-Concussion Syndrome

  1. ICD-10 Criteria for Postconcussional Syndrome
  2. Nonspecific Symptoms
  3. Importance of Targeted Symptomatic Treatment

Session III.

Treatment and Rehabilitation Services
Ross D. Zafonte, DO

Key Elements:

  • List some of the most common persistent symptoms and problems following mild TBI.
  • Have working knowledge of the Guidelines for Managing Persistent Symptoms Following Mild TBI (Second Edition).
  • Describe both pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions for persistent symptoms and problems.

Session Outline:

  1. Basic Principles: Focused, Evidence-Based Treatment for Specific Symptoms and Problems
  2. Post-Traumatic Headaches
  3. Sleep Disturbance
  4. Fatigue
  5. Balance and Visual Dysfunction
  6. Mental Health Symptoms
  7. Cognitive Difficulties

Session IV.

Cognitive Impairment, Cognitive Rehabilitation, and Physical Therapy
Grant L. Iverson, PhD; Lenore Herget, PT, DPT, MEd

Key Elements:

  • List 3 treatable conditions or factors that might have an adverse effect on cognitive functioning.
  • Name the symptoms and problems that are most appropriate for referral to physical therapy.
  • Describe physical therapy interventions for specific symptoms and problems.

Session Outline:

Part 1. Cognitive Impairment and Cognitive Rehabilitation

  1. Numerous factors can have an adverse effect on cognitive functioning
  2. Cognitive impairment can range from very mild to severe dementia
  3. Cognitive rehabilitation therapy can be restorative or compensatory
  4. There is limited research on the effectiveness of cognitive rehabilitation, especially with mild TBI
  5. Veterans might have Multiple reasons for cognitive impairment, many of qhich are treatable

Part 2. Physical Therapy

  1. Target Symptoms: Headaches, Dizziness, Balance Problems, and Visual Disturbance
  2. Cervical Therapy
  3. Balance and Vestibular Therapy
  4. Therapy for Visual Disturbances

Bonus (Non-Accredited) Session

Hypopituitarism After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury
Nicholas A. Tritos, MD, DSc

Faculty

  • Senior Physical Therapist, Sports Physical Therapy Service, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Professor, Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School
    Director, MassGeneral Hospital for Children Sports Concussion Program
    Associate Director, Traumatic Brain Injury, Red Sox Foundation and Massachusetts General Hospital Home Base Program
  • Associate Psychologist, Massachusetts General Hospital
    Program Director, The Bulfinch Program
    Clinical Psychologist, Home Base Program
    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School
  • Staff Neuroendocrinologist, Neuroendocrine Unit and the Neuroendocrine and Pituitary Tumor Clinical Center, Massachusetts General Hospital
    Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
  • Vice President of Medical Affairs, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital
    Clinical and Research Leader for Traumatic Brain Injury, Red Sox Foundation and Massachusetts General Hospital Home Base Program
    Earle P. and Ida S. Charlton Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School

Target Audience

This program is intended for:

  • Psychiatrists
  • Psychologists
  • General and Family Practice Physicians
  • Physician Assistants
  • Nurses
  • Social Workers
  • Licensed Mental Health Counselors
  • Residents and Fellows

Moderator

Through the duration of the course, the designated faculty moderator will respond to any clinical questions that are submitted to the interactive discussion board. The moderator for this course is:

  • Grant L. Iverson, PhD

Educational Support

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