Click the video below to hear Conference Chair, Dr. Jordan Smoller, convey the benefits of attending the
first annual Conference on Precision Psychiatry.

 

 


Visit the Center for Precision Psychiatry Website
featured speakers
Joshua Denny, MD, MS
Opening Plenary

Chief Executive Officer of the National Institutes of Health’s 𝐴𝑙𝑙 𝑜𝑓 𝑈𝑠 Research Program

Josh Denny is the Chief Executive Officer of the National Institutes of Health’s All of Us Research Program. He has been involved in All of Us from its inception, first as a member of the Advisory Committee to the (NIH) Director Precision Medicine Initiative Working Group, which developed the program’s initial scientific blueprint. He led the program’s initial prototyping project and served as the principal investigator for the All of Us Data and Research Center.

As a physician scientist, Josh is deeply committed to improving patient care through the advancement of precision medicine. Before joining the NIH, Josh was a Professor of Biomedical Informatics and Medicine, Director of the Center for Precision Medicine, and Vice President for Personalized Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. In his roles at VUMC, he was both a practicing internist and a researcher. His research interests include use of electronic health records (EHRs) and genomics to better understand disease and drug response. He also led efforts implementing precision medicine to improve patient outcomes. Josh was a leader in the development of phenome‐wide association studies (PheWAS) and phenotype risk scores. He served as PI for Vanderbilt sites in the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network, Pharmacogenomics Research Network (PGRN), and the Implementing Genomics into Practice (IGNITE) Network.

He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine, the American Society for Clinical Investigation, and the American College of Medical Informatics.

Joshua A. Gordon, MD, PhD
Keynote

Director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

Dr. Gordon received his MD/PhD degree at the University of California, San Francisco and completed his Psychiatry residency and research fellowship at Columbia University. He joined the Columbia faculty in 2004 as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry where he conducted research, taught residents, and maintained a general psychiatry practice. In September of 2016, he became the Director of the National Institute of Mental Health.

Dr. Gordon’s research focuses on the analysis of neural activity in mice carrying mutations of relevance to psychiatric disease. His lab studies genetic models of these diseases from an integrative neuroscience perspective, focused on understanding how a given disease mutation leads to a behavioral phenotype across multiple levels of analysis. To this end, he employs a range of systems neuroscience techniques, including in vivo anesthetized and awake behaving recordings and optogenetics, which is the use of light to control neural activity. His work has direct relevance to schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, and depression.

Dr. Gordon’s work has been recognized by several prestigious awards, including the The Brain and Behavior Research Foundation – NARSAD Young Investigator Award, the Rising Star Award from the International Mental Health Research Organization, the A.E. Bennett Research Award from the Society of Biological Psychiatry, and the Daniel H. Efron Research Award from the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology.

agenda

Thursday Agenda
1:00pm-1:15pm Welcome Remarks
Jordan W. Smoller, MD, ScD
Maurizio Fava, MD
1:15pm-1:45pm The All of Us Research Program
Joshua Denny, MD, MS
1:45pm-3:15pm Precision Prediction & Prevention

Session Chair: Lea Davis, PhD

1:45pm-2:15pm Individualized Detection Models for People at Risk of Psychosis
Paolo Fusar-Poli, PhD
2:15pm-2:45pm Precision Prediction for Suicide Prevention: Defining the Jobs Before Building the Tools
Gregory E. Simon, MD, MPH
2:45pm-3:15pm Fireside Chat: Precision Prediction & Prevention (inc. Q&A)
Gregory E. Simon, MD, MPH
Moderator: Lea Davis, PhD
3:15pm-3:30pm Brief Break
3:30pm-5:30pm Precision Treatment Stratification and Biomarkers

Session Chair: Karmel Choi, PhD

3:30pm-4:00pm Pragmatic Precision Psychiatry: A New Direction for Optimizing Treatment Selection
Ronald C. Kessler, PhD
4:00pm-4:30pm Precision Psychiatry for Depression and Anxiety: Using Biotypes to Personalize Treatment Selection
Leanne Williams, PhD
4:30pm-5:00pm A Circuits-First Approach to Mental Illness
Amit Etkin, MD, PhD
5:00pm-5:30pm Polygenic Risk Scores for Psychiatry
Naomi Wray, PhD
5:30pm-5:45pm Closing Remarks
Jordan W. Smoller, MD, ScD
Friday Agenda
8:45am-9:00am Welcome Remarks
Jordan W. Smoller, MD, ScD
9:00am-9:30am Precision Psychiatry, A Vision for the Future
Joshua A. Gordon, MD, PhD
9:30am-10:00am Moderated Discussion/Q&A
Joshua A. Gordon, MD, PhD
Jordan W. Smoller, MD, ScD
10:00am-11:30am Genomic Medicine and Pharmacogenetics

Session Chair: Elise Robinson, ScD

10:00am-10:30am Identification of Neuropsychiatric CNVs in a Health System Population: High Prevalence, Penetrance, and Personal Utility
Christa Martin, PhD, FACMG
10:30am-11:00am Genetic Architecture and Precision Medicine in Neuropsychiatric Diseases
David B. Goldstein, PhD
11:00am-11:45am Debate: Psychiatric Pharmacogenetics What is it good for?
Roy Perlis, MD
Daniel Mueller, MD, PhD
11:45am-12:00pm Brief Break
12:00pm-1:30pm Precision Neuroscience & Novel Therapeutics

Session Chair: Jeremiah Scharf, MD, PhD

12:00pm-12:30pm Building Precision into Translational Therapeutics: Mechanisms and Modulation of Compulsive Behaviors
Carolyn Rodriguez, MD, PhD
12:30pm-1:00pm Integrative genomics in human psychiatric and neurologic disorders for novel therapeutics
Daniel Geschwind, MD, PhD
1:00pm-1:30pm Digital Therapeutics and Their Implications for Precision Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders
Sabine Wilhelm, PhD
1:30pm-1:45pm Brief Break
1:45pm-2:45pm Hot Topics
1:45pm-2:15pm Sensing devices and wearables
Tanzeem Choudhury, PhD
2:15pm-2:45pm Industry Panel
Adam Chekroud, Spring Health
Murray Abramson, Tempus
Moderator: Maurizio Fava, MD
2:45pm-3:00pm Closing Remarks
Jordan W. Smoller, MD, ScD

All presentation titles are a work-in-progress; detailed titles to be confirmed ASAP

featured speakers

This new annual international conference brings together the community of scientists,
industry partners and healthcare leaders in the emerging field
of precision psychiatry, advancing interest in the application of precision medicine
to psychiatric research and clinical practice.

 

Join us on September 30th and October 1st to hear from leading experts.
View the full agenda here.

speakers
Murray Abramson, MD, MPH

Tempus, Head of Clinical Innovation

Dr. Murray Abramson is the Senior Vice President of Clinical Innovation at Tempus, a technology company advancing precision medicine solutions. Murray received his Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry with honors from Duke University; his Medical Degree with honors from Duke University Medical School. Murray joined the Duke medical faculty in the Department of Medicine and Division of Infectious Diseases where he was also appointed as the Director of the Infectious Diseases Research Consortium of the Duke Clinical Research Institute. In 2000, Murray started his 12+ year career at Merck, where he had positions of increasing clinical, operational, and leadership responsibilities in clinical development. He joined Biogen in late 2011 in the role of Vice President, Global Clinical Operations. Murray built a data-driven, efficient organization focused on science, patent needs, quality, and compliance to execute on the Biogen portfolio of clinical trials, phases 1-4.

Adam Chekroud, PhD

President & Co-Founder and Chief Product Officer at Spring Health and Assistant Professor Adjunct, Psychiatry at Yale School of Medicine

Adam is co-founder and President of Spring Health, a mental health company based in New York City. Spring works with large employers like PepsiCo and Whole Foods to provide their employees with free and immediate access to high-quality mental healthcare. The company has raised over $300M and has thousands of providers in its network. He is also an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Yale University. His research seeks to improve treatment outcomes in mental health, particularly depression, by using large existing datasets to anticipate barriers to treatment and likely illness course. His research has been featured in the Lancet, JAMA Psychiatry, Lancet Psychiatry, and PNAS, and covered in the Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, BBC, CNN, and NPR.

Karmel Choi, PhD
Session Chair

Clinical Psychologist and Member of the Faculty at Harvard Medical School; Director, Precision Prevention Program at the MGH Center for Precision Psychiatry

Dr. Karmel Choi is a clinical psychologist whose research focuses on genetic, epidemiological, and translational methods to characterize the nature of psychiatric resilience and inform the prevention of common stress-related disorders like depression and PTSD across the life course. Dr. Choi directs the Precision Prevention Program in the MGH Center for Precision Psychiatry.

Tanzeem Choudhury, PhD

Professor of Computing and Information Sciences and the Roger and Joelle Burnell Chair in Integrated Health and Technology at Cornell Tech

Tanzeem Choudhury is a Professor of Computing and Information Sciences at Cornell Tech where she holds the Roger and Joelle Burnell Chair in Integrated Health and Technology. She also leads the Digital Signals, Therapeutics, and Mental Healths at Optum Labs and is a co-founder of HealthRhythms Inc, a company whose mission is to add the layer of behavioral health into all of healthcare. At Cornell, she directs the People-Aware Computing group, which focuses on innovating the future of technology-assisted well-being. The group’s research in sensing-to-intervention is helping transform healthcare from a reactive to proactive system. Tanzeem received her PhD from the Media Laboratory at MIT and her undergraduate degree in Electrical Engineering from University of Rochester. She has been awarded the MIT Technology Review TR35 award, NSF CAREER award, TED Fellowship, Kavli Fellowship, ACM Distinguished Membership, and Ubiquitous Computing 10-year Impact Award. For more information, please visit: http://pbh.tech.cornell.edu

Lea K. Davis, PhD
Moderator and Session Chair

Assistant Professor in the Division of Genetic Medicine/​Department of Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Lea Davis is an Associate Professor of Genetic Medicine, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and Biomedical Informatics at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Her lab works at the intersection of genetic epidemiology, psychiatry, and medical informatics to investigate the genetic basis of a wide range of mental health conditions. She is co-PI of the PsycheMERGE network which seeks to advance precision psychiatry through pre-translational psychiatric genomics research in an electronic health record (EHR) setting. Using data extracted from medical records and linked with genomic information, Dr. Davis’s group discovers how polygenic risk, rare variant risk, and environment interact to result in common psychiatric diagnoses and their comorbidities. A major effort in the Davis lab focuses on understanding the biological and environmental linkages between mental and physical health. In addition to her work in psychiatric genomics, Dr. Davis has a long-standing interest in research ethics, genomic privacy, and furthering social justice through science. She currently chairs the ISPG Ethics committee and is a member of the ISPG Board of Directors.

Joshua Denny, MD, MS
Opening Plenary

Chief Executive Officer of the National Institutes of Health’s 𝐴𝑙𝑙 𝑜𝑓 𝑈𝑠 Research Program

Josh Denny is the Chief Executive Officer of the National Institutes of Health’s All of Us Research Program. He has been involved in All of Us from its inception, first as a member of the Advisory Committee to the (NIH) Director Precision Medicine Initiative Working Group, which developed the program’s initial scientific blueprint. He led the program’s initial prototyping project and served as the principal investigator for the All of Us Data and Research Center.

As a physician scientist, Josh is deeply committed to improving patient care through the advancement of precision medicine. Before joining the NIH, Josh was a Professor of Biomedical Informatics and Medicine, Director of the Center for Precision Medicine, and Vice President for Personalized Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. In his roles at VUMC, he was both a practicing internist and a researcher. His research interests include use of electronic health records (EHRs) and genomics to better understand disease and drug response. He also led efforts implementing precision medicine to improve patient outcomes. Josh was a leader in the development of phenome‐wide association studies (PheWAS) and phenotype risk scores. He served as PI for Vanderbilt sites in the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network, Pharmacogenomics Research Network (PGRN), and the Implementing Genomics into Practice (IGNITE) Network.

He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine, the American Society for Clinical Investigation, and the American College of Medical Informatics.

Amit Etkin, MD, PhD

Founder and CEO at Alto Neuroscience Inc., Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University, and a member of the Wu Tsai Neuroscience Institute at Stanford.

Amit Etkin, MD, PhD is the Founder,and CEO of Alto Neuroscience, as well as a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford and a member of the Wu Tsai Neuroscience Institute at Stanford. He has received multiple awards, most notably the NIH Director’s Pioneer Award in 2017, for groundbreaking work in clinical psychiatry and neuroscience. Dr. Etkin is trained as both as a neuroscientist and psychiatrist, with scientific experience ranging from molecular biology through machine learning and human clinical trials. The overarching aim of the Dr. Etkin’s work has been understanding the neural basis of emotional disorders and their treatment, and leveraging this knowledge to better understand how the brain works and to develop novel treatment interventions. Alto is a biotechnology company delivering on this vision, and is developing precision medicines across psychiatric disorders.

Paolo Fusar-Poli, PhD

Professor of Preventive Psychiatry at the Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN) and Director of the Early Psychosis: Intervention and Clinical-detection Laboratory (EPIC Lab) at King's College London

Paolo Fusar-Poli is a Professor of Preventive Psychiatry at the Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN), King’s College London (KCL), where he heads the Early Psychosis: Intervention and Clinical-detection Laboratory (EPIC Lab). He is also a consultant psychiatrist in the Outreach And Support In South-London (OASIS) mental health service at the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, one of the oldest and largest preventive services worldwide. Much of his research utilises evidence-based medicine, clinical prediction, neuroscience and experimental therapeutics and aims to develop new and effective strategies to improve the prevention of mental disorders.

He completed his medical studies, psychiatric training, PhD and first consultant job at the University of Pavia, Italy, where he is Associate Professor. During his PhD he moved to the IoPPN: this collaborative relationship has continued ever since.

He is author of about 400 publications in PubMed journals, with h-index of 94 (up to 2021), invited speaker and/or chairman in several national and international scientific conferences and principal investigator or co-investigator of national and international grants focused on the prevention of mental disorders. He chairs national and international clinical research networks for the prevention of mental disorders.

 

Daniel Geschwind, MD, PhD

Gordon and Virginia MacDonald Distinguished Professor of Human Genetics, Neurology and Psychiatry at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles

Dr. Dan Geschwind is the Gordon and Virginia MacDonald Distinguished Professor of Human Genetics, Neurology and Psychiatry at UCLA. Dr. Geschwind is a pioneer in the transcriptomic and functional genomic analyses of the nervous system. His laboratory showed that gene co-expression has a reproducible network structure that can be used to understand neurobiological mechanisms in health and disease. He led the first studies to define the molecular pathology of autism and several other major psychiatric disorders, and has made major contributions to defining the genetic basis of autism. The arching goal of Dr. Geschwind’s work is to develop a more mechanistic understanding of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases by integrative analyses that connect human genetic variation to genes and neurobiological pathways. The hope is that by understanding disease mechanisms we can develop more rationale and effective therapeutics for brain disorders. Dr. Geschwind has also been an early and persistent advocate for data sharing, having developed several resources housing patient genetic and phenotype data, including the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) and currently is the chair of the PsychENCODE consortium. He received the Derek Denny-Brown Neurological Scholar Award from the American Neurological Association in 2004, an NIH MERIT Award (NIMH), the Scientific Service Award from Autism Speaks in 2007, the Ruane Prize for Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Research from the Brain and Behavior foundation in 2012, the Amgen early innovators award in 2018 and the Gold Medal from the Society of Biological Society in 2021. He is an elected member of the American Academy of Physicians, and the National Academy of Medicine, USA

David B. Goldstein, PhD

Director, Columbia University Institute for Genomic Medicine

David Goldstein is the John E. Borne Professor of Genetics and Development and Director of the Institute for Genomic Medicine at Columbia University Medical Center. His primary research interests include human genetic diversity, the genetics of disease, and pharmacogenetics. The Goldstein group and collaborators have discovered a number of disease causing genes and syndromes, in particular neurological and infectious diseases. Dr. Goldstein is also responsible for establishing a group of Precision Medicine Initiatives in partnership with New York Presbyterian Hospital and in collaboration with key faculty and physicians at CUIMC – these initiatives enroll thousands of patients annually in the areas of epilepsy, maternal fetal medicine, kidney and liver disease, ALS and undiagnosed childhood disease.

Joshua A. Gordon, MD, PhD
Keynote

Director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

Dr. Gordon received his MD/PhD degree at the University of California, San Francisco and completed his Psychiatry residency and research fellowship at Columbia University. He joined the Columbia faculty in 2004 as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry where he conducted research, taught residents, and maintained a general psychiatry practice. In September of 2016, he became the Director of the National Institute of Mental Health.

Dr. Gordon’s research focuses on the analysis of neural activity in mice carrying mutations of relevance to psychiatric disease. His lab studies genetic models of these diseases from an integrative neuroscience perspective, focused on understanding how a given disease mutation leads to a behavioral phenotype across multiple levels of analysis. To this end, he employs a range of systems neuroscience techniques, including in vivo anesthetized and awake behaving recordings and optogenetics, which is the use of light to control neural activity. His work has direct relevance to schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, and depression.

Dr. Gordon’s work has been recognized by several prestigious awards, including the The Brain and Behavior Research Foundation – NARSAD Young Investigator Award, the Rising Star Award from the International Mental Health Research Organization, the A.E. Bennett Research Award from the Society of Biological Psychiatry, and the Daniel H. Efron Research Award from the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology.

Ronald C. Kessler, PhD

McNeil Family Professor of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School

Ronald C. Kessler, Ph.D. is the McNeil Family Professor of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School and Director of the World Health Organization World Mental Health (WMH) Survey Initiative. WMH carries out mental health needs assessment surveys for governments around the world, advises governments on unmet need for treatment of mental disorders in their countries, and collaborates in the design, implementation, and evaluation of diverse interventions for these disorders. Kessler also guides a clinical epidemiological precision medicine initiative at the VA Center of Excellence in Suicide Prevention to address the problem of Veteran suicides. He is the author of over 1000 publications and has been rated as the most widely cited researcher in the world in the field of psychiatry for each of the past fifteen years. He is a member of the US National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Medicine as well as a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Kessler earned his PhD in sociology from New York University, completed a postdoctoral fellowship in psychiatric epidemiology at the University of Wisconsin, and was on the faculty at the University of Michigan before taking his current position in 1995 at HMS.

Christa L. Martin, PhD FACMG

Interim Chief Scientific Officer at Geisinger; Professor and Founding Director of the Autism & Developmental Medicine Institute at Geisinger

Dr. Christa Lese Martin, PhD, FACMG, is the Chief Scientific Officer at Geisinger and a Professor and the founding Director of their Autism & Developmental Medicine Institute. She is Board-certified by the American Board of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ABMGG) as a clinical genetics laboratory director. Her research focuses on using a “genetics-first” approach to characterize neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders with an ultimate goal of developing precision health-driven treatments to improve patient outcomes. Dr. Martin received her Bachelor of Science degree from Penn State University and completed her PhD in Human Genetics at the University of Pittsburgh. She did her postdoctoral training at the University of Chicago in the Department of Human Genetics where she remained on faculty. Before joining Geisinger, Dr. Martin was an Associate Professor in the Department of Human Genetics at Emory University and Operations Director of Emory Genetics Laboratory.

Daniel Mueller, MD, PhD

Daniel Mueller, MD, PhD Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology, Institute of Medical Science at the University of Toronto; Head, Pharmacogenetics Research Clinic, Staff Psychiatrist at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) in Toronto

Dr. Daniel Mueller is a Clinician Scientist and a Professor at the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto. He is a leading expert in psychiatric genetics and pharmacogenetics aiming to achieve better symptom remission and prevent adverse events from psychiatric medications. He has published more than 250 articles with focus on precision medicine and has received several prestigious awards in this emerging and important field. His publications also address clinical implementation of pharmacogenetic testing including expert guidelines in collaboration with the Clinical Pharmacogenomics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) and the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics (ISPG).

Roy H. Perlis, MD, MSc

Professor of Psychiatry, HMS Director, Center for Experimental Drugs and Diagnostics, MGH

Roy Perlis, MD, MSc is Associate Chief for Research in the Department of Psychiatry, Director of the Center for Quantitative Health at Massachusetts General Hospital, and Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. He serves as Associate Editor (Neuroscience) at JAMA’s new open-access journal, JAMA Network – Open. He graduated from Brown University, Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health, and completed his residency, chief residency, and clinical/research fellowship at MGH before joining the faculty.

Dr. Perlis’s research is focused on identifying predictors of treatment response in brain diseases, and using these biomarkers to develop novel treatments. He directs two complementary laboratory efforts, one focused on patient-derived cellular models and one applying machine learning to large clinical databases. These two programs converge in the MGH NeuroBank, one of the largest cellular biobanks in the world for the study of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. The NeuroBank spans more than 400 cell lines associated with detailed clinical phenotypic assessment and links to electronic health records.

Elise Robinson, ScD
Session Chair

Assistant Professor of Epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and an Institute Member of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Elise Robinson is an assistant investigator for the Center for Genomic Medicine and Department of Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital and an institute member of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. She is also an affiliated faculty member with the Analytic and Translational Genetics Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Robinson’s research focuses on the genetic epidemiology of behavior and cognition. She is interested in using genetic data to understand the biology of neurodevelopmental variation, and to study differences within and between neuropsychiatric disorders.

The Robinson lab uses techniques from statistical genetics and epidemiology to study how common and rare genetic risk factors for severe neuropsychiatric disorders may differ, and develops approaches for examining these questions in large samples.

Robinson received a Sc.D. in psychiatric epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health, supervised by Karestan Koenen. She completed postdoctoral training in the lab of Mark Daly at MGH and the Broad Institute, using statistical genetic approaches to study neurodevelopmental disorders.

Carolyn Rodriguez, MD, PhD

Director of the Translational Therapeutics Lab and Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine

Dr. Carolyn Rodriguez is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Stanford University School of Medicine, Associate Chair for Inclusion and Diversity in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University, and a Consultation-Liaison Psychiatrist at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs. As the Director of the Translational Therapeutics Lab and Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Dr. Rodriguez leads studies investigating the brain basis of severe mental disorders. Her landmark clinical trials pioneer rapid-acting treatments for illnesses including Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Her NIH-, foundation-, and donor-funded mechanistic and clinical efficacy studies span targeted glutamatergic and opioid pathway pharmacotherapy, noninvasive brain stimulation, and psychotherapy for OCD, PTSD, and hoarding disorder.

Dr. Rodriguez also serves as Deputy Editor of The American Journal of Psychiatry, member of the Research Council of the American Psychiatric Association, member of Brain & Behavior Research Foundation Scientific Council, and Scientific and Clinical Advisory Board member of the International OCD Foundation. She has won several national awards, including the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). The PECASE recognizes investigators who are pursuing bold and innovative projects at the early stages of their careers and is considered one of the highest honors in scientific research. Carolyn presented her research at the World Economic Forum in Davos, and her work has been highlighted by organizations including NPR, PBS, New York Times, ABC News, NBC News, Newsweek, and Time.com. She contributes articles to Harvard Business Review and Huffington Post to share scientific findings with the public.

Carolyn received her B.S. in Computer Science from Harvard University, followed by an M.D. from Harvard Medical School-M.I.T. and a Ph.D. in Neuroscience and Genetics from Harvard Medical School. Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, she now lives with her husband and three children in Palo Alto.

Jeremiah Scharf, MD, PhD
Session Chair

Assistant Professor of Neurology, HMS; Co-Director, MGH-Tourette Association of America Center of Excellence and Co-Chair, Tourette Syndrome Association International Consortium for Genetics

Dr. Scharf is a behavioral neurologist and neuropsychiatric geneticist who works at the interface between neurology and psychiatry, employing statistical and molecular genetics techniques along with clinical research tools to investigate the etiology and pathogenesis of Tourette Syndrome (TS), OCD and related disorders as model neuropsychiatric illnesses. His research lab aims to understand how genetic variation contributes to the unique and overlapping features of these disorders which may provide novel insight into disease pathophysiology and ultimately lead to improved outcome prediction and treatment. Dr. Scharf is co-Chair of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium TS/OCD Workgroup, Contact PI for two multi-center NIH grants for TS genetics, and a member of the BFRB Precision Medicine Initiative. Lastly, Dr. Scharf particularly values his mission to educate students, peers, and the public about TS and related disorders aimed at reducing stigma for patients and their families.

Gregory E. Simon, MD, MPH

Senior Investigator, Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute and Psychiatrist at the Washington Permanente Medical Group

Gregory Simon MD MPH is an investigator at Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, a psychiatrist in Kaiser Permanente’s Behavioral Health Service, and a Research Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington. Dr. Simon’s research focuses on improving access to and quality of mental health care, especially for mood disorders and people at risk for self-harm and suicide. Specific areas of research include improving adherence to medication, increasing the availability of effective psychotherapy, personalization of treatment for mood disorders, evaluating peer support by and for people with mood disorders, prediction of suicidal behavior, population-based suicide prevention programs, and racial/ethnic disparities in mental health care. Dr. Simon currently leads the Mental Health Research Network, an NIMH-funded cooperative agreement supporting population-based mental health research across 14 large health systems.

Jordan Smoller, MD, ScD
Conference Chair and Moderator

MGH Trustees Endowed Chair in Psychiatric Neuroscience, Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and Director of the MGH Center for Precision Psychiatry

Jordan Smoller, MD, ScD, is a psychiatrist, epidemiologist and geneticist whose research focus has been understanding the genetic and environmental determinants of psychiatric disorders across the lifespan and using big data to advance precision mental health including improved methods to reduce risk and enhance resilience. 

Dr. Smoller earned his undergraduate degree summa cum laude at Harvard University and his medical degree at Harvard Medical School. After completing residency training in psychiatry at McLean Hospital, he received masters and doctoral degrees in epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health. 

Dr. Smoller is the Massachusetts General Hospital Trustees Endowed Chair in Psychiatric Neuroscience, professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and professor in the Department of Epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston. He is associate chief for research in the Mass General Department of Psychiatry, director of the Center for Precision Psychiatry and director of the Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit in the Mass General Center for Genomic Medicine. Dr. Smoller is a Tepper Family MGH Research Scholar and also serves as director of the Omics Unit of the Mass General Division of Clinical Research and co-director of the Mass General Brigham Biobank. He is director of the Mass General Brigham Training Program in Precision and Genomic Medicine, an associate member of the Broad Institute, co-chair of the Cross-Disorder Workgroup of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium and president of the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics. 

He has played a leading role in national and international efforts to advance precision medicine. He is a Principal Investigator (PI) in the eMERGE (Electronic Medical Records and Genomics) network, founding PI of the PsycheMERGE Consortium and lead PI of the New England Precision Medicine Consortium as part of the NIH All of Us Research Program and co-Chair of the All of Us Science Committee. Dr. Smoller is an author of more than 400 scientific publications and is also the author of The Other Side of Normal (HarperCollins/William Morrow, 2012).

Leanne Williams, PhD

Founding Director of the PanLab for Precision Psychiatry and Translational Neuroscience and Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and, by courtesy, of Psychology at Stanford University School of Medicine and Director of Education and Precision Medicine at VA Palo Alto

Leanne Williams, Ph.D. is a Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine.
She is the founding director of the Stanford Center for Precision Mental Health and Wellness and of the Stanford PanLab for Precision Psychiatry and Translational Neuroscience, Associate Chair of Translational Neuroscience in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and Director of Education and Precision Medicine at the Palo Alto VA Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center.
Prior to joining the Stanford community, Dr. Williams was the founding chair of Cognitive Neuropsychiatry and directed the Brain Dynamics Center at Sydney Medical School.
Her PhD was completed with a British Council Scholarship for study at Oxford University.

Dr. Williams’ Center and translational programs integrate advanced neuroimaging, technology and digital innovation to transform the way we detect mental disorders, tailor interventions and promote wellness. She has developed the first taxonomy for depression and anxiety that quantifies brain circuits for diagnostic precision and prediction. Dr. Williams’ research programs are supported by funding from the National Institutes of Health, spanning priority Research Domain Criteria, Human Connectome and Science of Behavior Change initiatives. She has contributed over 340 scientific papers to the field.

Sabine Wilhelm, PhD

Chief of Psychology, Massachusetts General Hospital Director, OCD Program, Massachusetts General Hospital Chair, Digital Health Think Tank Professor, Harvard Medical School

Sabine Wilhelm, Ph.D., is a Professor at Harvard Medical School, and Chief of Psychology as well as Director of the Center for OCD and Related Disorders at Massachusetts General Hospital. She is also the Chair of the Digital Health Think Tank in Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Wilhelm is recognized as a leading researcher in obsessive-compulsive and body dysmorphic disorder and her early work focused on the development and testing of new treatments for these disorders. Her recent research focuses on the use of cutting-edge technology to improve and personalize mental health care for a range of mental health concerns. Dr. Wilhelm has 300 publications, including seven books, and has given more than 255 lectures on these subjects. She has been a mentor to more than 48 junior investigators in the field. Dr. Wilhelm received many awards, including the Peter K. Ranney Innovation Award from the World Medical Innovation Forum for her presentation “Bridging the Mental Health Treatment Gap” as well as the Claflin Distinguished Scholar in Medicine Award. She is currently working on smartphone-based treatments for OCD, body dysmorphic disorder and depression, as well as on interventions that promote general well-being. Her ultimate goal is to use technology-based interventions to enhance access to high quality mental health interventions globally.

Naomi Wray, PhD

Professor at the Queensland Brain Institute (QBI) of the University of Queensland (Brisbane, Australia) and Australian National Health and Medical Research Council Principal Research Fellow

Naomi Wray holds joint appointments at the Institute for Molecular Bioscience and the Queensland Brain Institute within the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. She is a National Health and Medical Research Council Leadership Fellow, a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science and a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Science. Her early training was in quantitative genetics theory. Polygenic risk prediction has been a research focus of her group since 2007. She has played a leading role in several publications from the international Psychiatric Genomics Consortium.

Leading experts will present on a broad range of domains, tools and findings across
several major areas of interest in psychiatry, including:

Data science and big data analytics including use of AI/ML Genomics and other omics Biomarkers development and validation Precision therapeutics
Risk stratification for suicide and other important outcomes mHealth and digital technologies Implementation science and clinical decision support Learning health systems
Ethical, legal and social issues

Program Committee Members (Alphabetical Order):

Karmel Choi, PhD
Lee Cohen, MD
Maurizio Fava, MD
Amy Fitzpatrick, MBA, MSW
Robbie Mealer, MD, PhD
Andy Nierenberg, MD
Matt Nock, PhD
Roy Perlis, MD
Jordan Smoller, MD, ScD
Sabine Wilhelm, PhD